Helping Your Child Make Friends

Friendships and socializing with other children sometimes comes naturally but often the are bumps in the road even with the most caring and loving child. Check out this guest blog with great tips for new parents to learn the art of helping your toddler make friends.

Helping your Toddler Make Friends

Parents often worry that their toddler is too timid to make friends and every effort to help them socialize seems to backfire. Socialization is an important milestone in your child’s life but some kids take time to make friends. Toddlers want to reach out to other children but like adults, they have fears and insecurities wondering if the other child will steal their toy or refuse to play with them. Don’t let your anxiety get the better of you; instead, work out ways to help your child hone their social skills.

7 ways to help your toddler make friends

 

1.       Take it slow

You were the first person your child interacted with, so although he is now interested in the world around him, he still turns to you for security and comfort. Separation anxiety in toddlers generally peaks at 12 to 18 months so if your child seems a little extra clingy during this period, don’t admonish him for it, instead help him overcome his fears at a slow and steady pace. A simple way to do this is to let him make friends with just one child at a time so that he does not feel overwhelmed.

 

2.       Encourage your child to parallel play

If your child is a little shy, don’t force him to interact with other children. A simple way to coax him out of his shell is to encourage him to parallel play – where he can play by himself while sitting next to another toddler who is also playing by himself. Parallel play is the first step of socialization as your child will soon move from parallel play to parallel-aware play, where they acknowledge each other with a tentative smile.

 

3.       Be an “emotion coach."

It’s natural for children to experience negative emotions so teaching your toddler to control these responses will go a long way in helping them socialize with other children. Don’t dismiss their negative emotions but instead talk to them to understand what they are feeling so that you can help solve the problem. A recent study found that children are better at regulating their emotions and developing friendships when their mothers used emotion socialization strategies.

 

4.       Get involved in playtime

You dread the thought of turning into a helicopter parent and so you try to fade into the background and allow your toddler to learn on his own. However, this will probably bring your child’s insecurities and fears to the surface and they may feel abandoned. Instead of adopting a ‘sink or swim’ attitude, you can arrange a playdate where both the mums get involved in playtime. Play with the other child as well so that your toddler can follow your example and learn to make friends easily.

 

5.       Don’t force your child to share

“Give your truck to Michael, you need to share it… play with another toy” – if this sounds like something you would normally say to your toddler, you might be doing more harm than good. Forcing your child to share can have the opposite impact on your child’s sharing skills as they instinctively feel that their ownership is being challenged. Instead, of forcing your child to share, teach your child to take turns with playing with a toy. Never snatch a toy from your child and give it to his new friend as you’re modelling grabbing which will make your child more possessive.

 

6.       Time your toddler’s playdates

Whether it’s music, baking, standup comedy or setting up a playdate, timing is everything! The most important thing is to decide a start time and end time to the playdate. When scheduling, choose a time when your child is least likely to be tired or cranky – generally, this is the morning. Limit the playdate to 45 minutes to an hour as your child will probably get tired or fussy if playtime lasts for over an hour. It is better to keep first interactions brief and only once your child is comfortable with his new friend, you can extend the playdate to over an hour.

 

7.       Teach your child empathy

Empathy is the ability to understand and share another person’s feelings and feeling another child’s pain would be unpleasant so obviously your child’s instinct would be to avoid it. Parenting experts at Whattoexpect.com recommend that you talk to your child about these feelings and help to bolster his self-regulation skills so that he feels secure which will allow him to overcome this reaction. Encourage your child to understand what his friend is feeling so that he can understand his actions. For example, if your son grabs his friend’s toy, don’t try to take it away from him immediately, instead, explain that his friend is sad because your son took away his toy. Always follow-up with what your son can do to solve the problem – in this case, you can tell him that his friend will be happy once he gives the toy back.

 

Some toddlers take time to develop social skills so learn to be patient with your child and understand that all of this is new to him. Don’t force him to interact with others but instead gently encourage him to make friends. There will be small squabbles along the way – be prepared for that and help to handle it and learn from it. Aggression in toddlers is a common problem and arises out of fears and insecurities so the best way to prevent such problems is to foster a strong sense of security so that he knows you will always be there for him.

toddler blog.PNG

Healthy Hearts-5 Important Habits for Kids

                                                                 Heart Health in Kids

 

I was inspired to write this as February is American Heart Month to remind everyone that heart health really starts in childhood to avoid cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Kids today have developed so many bad health habits that they are facing heart attacks in their 30s. Many experts predict they will be the first generation to have a lower life expectancy than their parents.  But it doesn’t need to be this way. Parents like you have a great influence over your kid’s habits. By modeling the behaviors as well as instilling positive habits, you can make a huge different in your child’s health. It’s all about establishing good habits and breaking the bad ones early on.  Our habits from childhood continue into our adult lives and can have a huge impact on our overall health more so than just our genetics.  So let’s not wait, here are some tips to improve heart health as well as avoid other chronic diseases.

heart.JPG

 

Move it- Daily exercise is a must. For kids at least an hour a day of heart pumping movement. Childhood is a great time to try out different activities and sports, whether team or solo to find a good fit. For kids rotating activities and sports is preferable to avoid over use injuries in growing bones, joints ligaments and muscles. The idea is those kids that are active in childhood will continue to seek out physical fitness as adults. I was into dance and gymnastics as a child but now bicycling, and pilates are more my speed. It doesn’t really matter what activity you do, as long as you get your muscles fired up, strengthening, improving balance and get your heart rate up -to help combat chronic diseases like osteoporosis, heart disease and improve mood. Remember family activities like walking the dog, raking leaves, and free play at the playground all count too!

More Plants – Eating a diet that is predominately plant based (fruits, veggies, whole grains) and less emphasis on protein from meat  is a great way to keep healthy . It provides loads of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants as well as lots of fiber to keep you full and regulate your sugar levels. Parents are always concerned about kids getting enough protein but in general, kids get more than even necessary on a daily basis whether it be meat, eggs, dairy, poultry, fish)  Opt for smaller portions and instead  pile on the fruits and veggies. Make those side dishes the main event! In addition limit cured, smoked and fried foods and opt for kids getting used to steamed, baked and sautéed foods.

Ditch Desserts- A common error with kids is too start a habit that a meal ends with dessert. Forget the sweets after dinner, you should end feeling adequate and full from the food on your plate.  If hungry a few hours later, first drink a glass of water or even milk. If need be give a snack that’s healthy and avoid the highly processed, sugary laden snacks. Save those for more special occasions rather than daily treats.  Another tip is portion control. I have an ice cream loving family so trade off between frozen fruit treats and ice cream and in addition portion control is key to feeling satisfied and avoiding binge eating from deprivation.  Serve a small single cupful of ice cream rather than ordering a large 2-3 scoops. Your kids will still be happy😊

Chat with Your Child- Though it may seem like your kid tunes you out or doesn’t want to hear what you have to say, start early and keep talking about dangers and risky behaviors of smoking. Kids who’s parents talk about drugs and alcohol are 42 percent less likely to use substances than those whose parents don’t. And I know as a pediatrician its not enough to just ask about cigarette use,  you must discuss E-cigarettes which now are all the rage and extremely addictive. The most common brand is JUUL that comes in enticing fruity flavors, and each one pod contains as much nicotine as a full pack of cigarettes! I am seeing teens who are using and can’t stop- they quickly become jittery, develop headaches, anxiety and nervousness, diarrhea and difficulty concentrating.  The other chemical carcinogens as well as nicotine are dangerous to the developing brain long term. And it appears those kids that start off with e-cigarette use “just for fun” end up using regular tobacco cigarettes at a much higher rate than kids who do not vape. Let your kids learn the facts from you and help them stay healthy now and avoid heart disease and lung cancer later on.

Preventive Care Visits-  Show your kids you care about their health and your own. Make sure to schedule family annual physical exams with your physicians and stay up to date on immunizations, routine lab tests and physical examinations to ensure your health is on track. Prevention is key to avoiding chronic disease. Its also a great time to get specific advice from your doctor if you have a concern or there is a family history of a certain disease. Partnering with your family doctor or pediatrician, asking questions and being a role model will help your kids stay connected to the health system as they become young adults and in charge of their health.  Remember starting them down the right path with good health habits can make all the difference now and into their future.

 

Motrin or Tylenol: The Great Debate for Treating Fever in Kids

                            Motrin vs Tylenol: The Great Debate for Treating Fever in KIds

 

As a pediatrician, I am asked on a daily basis from worried parents about what they should give their child with a fever,  Motrin (Ibuprofen) or Tylenol (acetaminophen) to bring down the temperature.

 This question always requires more than a one word response to the choice between antifever medications .  An explanation about if medication is even necessary for the fever and to clarify many long standing fever phobia misconceptions.  Mainly, it is not necessary to treat the number on the thermometer, nor is it always necessary to bring the temperature down.

 What is important is to address how the child is feeling and behaving regardless of their temperature. Are they happy, playful drinking fluids or are they cranky, irritable and uncomfortable? If the former then no fever reducing medicine is even necessary.  What pediatricians want parents to know is to not be scared of fever, it’s the body ‘s way of fighting off the infection. The goal of a fever reducer is to make a kid feel better so they can rest and recover.  The over the counter medicine does treat the illness nor make them better or less contagious any faster. The take home message is to use fever reducers for added comfort not just because your child has an elevated temperature documented on the thermometer.

 

Now that you have come to the decision that a fever reducer is warranted, here is some information on helping you decide which one to use Motrin or Tylenol.

Fever reducer tips by Dr. Jen

Fever reducer tips by Dr. Jen

 

Efficacy and Safety - Both Tylenol and Motrin are effective in bringing fever down in otherwise healthy kids over the age of 6 months.  From my longstanding experience with patients, the fever does tend to decrease  faster and remain lower a bit longer with Motrin than with Tylenol. But choosing which to give when your child is sick often comes down to what you have on hand in your kitchen or bathroom cabinet when your child needs it. Always use the measuring device that comes with the bottle or a measuring spoon or syringe. A kitchen spoon is not an accurate measure and can lead to under or even overdosing.

Length of Action- Tylenol can be given at 4 hour intervals as needed where as Motrin is every 6 hours. As a parent, it’s nice to have less dosages to administer, especially if it’s a struggle because your child does not like to take medicine in the first place.  An all to common practice in my opinion is alternating Tyenol and Motrin. Parents often do this to keep the fever “down” or suppressed. In most cases this is not needed especially if you remember treatment is for comfort and not trying to get the thermometer to read 98.6F. In addition alternating medication every 3-4 hours leads often to medication errors and overdoses which can potentially be severe. So if you are giving both,( a practice I rarely recommend) please make sure to write down which medicine, the dosage and what time it was given, so all caregivers are aware to avoid errors.

Dosing is Key- Regardless of whether you are giving Ibuprofen (Motrin) or acetaminophen (Tylenol), make sure you know the correct dosage for your child. Dosage is always based on their weight NOT on their age. This will help to ensure the medication works as weight is much more accurate than a child’s age (so keep their weight from their last check up visit handy). A common mistake I hear when a parent tells me that a fever reducer “didn’t work” is not giving the full recommended dosage. Often parents are scared of over medicating so they give a reduced or lesser amount than indicated and then are surprised it didn’t help the symptoms adequately.   Tip, if you are going to give a medication always give the correct full dosage each time.

Pros and Cons - Tylenol can be administered to infants under 6 months of age. It does not cause stomach upset and can be used for pain or for fever reducing and lasts about 4 hours. An added perk about acetaminophen is that it also comes in suppository form if your child is vomiting or refusing to take anything by mouth, often this is the easiest route to deliver the medicine in a sick infant/toddler.  The downside to Tylenol it can cause liver toxicity if given in excess or accidental overdose,  so give as directed and keep it stored high up and out of range when not in use.

Motrin is also great for fever reduction but has added benefit for reducing inflammation likes sports and muscle injuries. It keeps fever down longer and the dosing is less often at every 6-8 hours as needed. Remember Ibuprofen is for children over the age of 6 months of age, it may cause more stomach upset so avoid if your child is vomiting or not eating.

Lastly which fever reducer to give may ultimately come down to your child’s preference. Neither fever reducer will be helpful if they just won’t take it. Because both are safe and effective when taken correctly, opt for the one your child will take without a major meltdown or tantrum. This may be based on its flavor, consistency or even form ( liquid vs chewable)  And remember lots of extra TLC , added fluids to drink to avoid dehydration and even a tepid bath or cool compress on their forehead for added comfort and relief.

 

How To Say “NO” So Your Child Will Listen

Do you feel like you’re always saying No to your child and not getting the response from them that you are looking for? Do you end up repeating yourself over and over, so frustrated you begin to yell or just given in to your toddlers demands? Unfortunately, I hear this way too often from moms so I wanted to give some tips on the art of saying No that will get your child to cooperate, understand and be safe.

 To begin with, kids do much better when there are clear boundaries, routines and structure to their day. Consistency is key, not only with what you say but what you do. Your child is always watching you. The goal of discipline especially in a young toddler is to teach them to understand in order to get a desired result, it is not a punishment. So here’s my advice and strategies to making ‘NO” count.

How to say No

 

Tips on Saying NO to Your Child

 

Say NO less often- Really?? (yup its true) Use it only when you mean it and when necessary, for example to avoid dangers such as your toddler touching a hot stove, running into the street, hitting or biting.  They will quickly learn that “No” mean “No”, so don’t overuse it. Saying it all the time just dilutes its effectiveness and confuses kids as to its importance.

 

Distractions work – Instead of repeating “No” over and over when they want something they just can’t have, try distracting them with another item or engage them in a new activity.  Be sure not to get into a battle with them (most toddlers are great at manipulation, until we lose our patience and cave in to their whining.)

 

Catch them Being Good- So you probably think you do this and you probably do use praise but you know what most parents don’t realize it but they tend to more often tell their child what not to do or what they are doing wrong rather than praising accepted good behavior. So I recommend accentuate the positive way more often than the negative.  Give a lot of attention and praise to the good behavior and efforts. So if your child is playing nicely with his toys. Give her a shout out, that you noticed how attentive she is with her dolls. It also doesn’t haven’t to be verbal praise but just a touch or squeeze on their arm with a smile. Yes, this is called positive reinforcement and it works!

 

Ignore Bad Behavior – I know this seems counterintuitive but it really works. Attention around a child’s misbehavior increases the unwanted behavior. At every age kids like attention and sometimes they will even try to push your buttons to engage with them even if you’re yelling, making idle threats or seem angry. Their goal is to be heard, get their way and to pay attention to them. So how should you respond? I suggest “Planned ignoring” but it will only help to shape a child’s behavior if the child is getting positive attention most of the time. (see tip above) In addition once the undesired “bad” behavior stops, step in with the positive attention. Here is an example.

If your child is dropping food onto the floor from their high chair, instead of saying “NO don’t do that”, ignore the action, and as soon as she returns to eating appropriately, point it out and give some positive attention. With a smile say “I love the way you use your spoon” or “how clever you are to feed yourself” rather than focusing on your child throwing the food on to the floor. By doing this, you continuously shape the behaviors you want to see more of and the negative behaviors disappear.

 

Consistency is Key – One of the hardest things is being consistent, especially when you are a mom with 1001 things to do before the day ends.  I advise to pick your battles and don’t make idle threats (follow through is very important) If you have house rule that you only want kids eating in the kitchen and not in the tv room, you need to enforce it daily not every once in a while or your little one won’t be clear on the rules. In addition be a role model for your kids because kids are always watching and your actions speak louder than words.

 

Parenting is hard, as a mom of three I truly get it. (and one with special needs). I know how chaotic days can often be, but try your best to keep positive. Your children will definitely make mistakes and test your limits. They will be loud at times, whine, stomp their feet and want everything their way. This is part of child development and it’s an ongoing learning process. Fill most of the day with love, affection and consistency. Shaping behaviors, just like healthy habits takes time, energy and patience, but I guarantee it does work. Good Luck Mamas! Questions? Comments? Let me know how its going. – Dr. Jen

How to say NO

Best Toys for Tots This Holiday Season

Best Toys for Tots This Holiday Season

Holiday time is here and there is increasing advertisements and marketing directed at parents and children about what are the best toys and must haves this season. In addition, your kids will be asking and pleading for the latest or most updated tech games or apps that their friends have or want as well.  There is also is a lot of pressure and guilt around this time of year to make you feel the more you spend on gifts and toys, the happier your child will be. As a pediatrician and mom, I am hear to tell you differently.

Toys are really a tool, that can be used to help bring meaningful interactions between you and your child that can foster language skills, motor skills and social-emotional development.  These are very important aspects of play, more so than one gets from electronic, battery operated toys and so called “educational apps” for babies. Most of these claims are unsubstantiated, with little or no scientific evidence, particular in young infants, and may be potentially harmful if used in excess.

toy2.JPG

Here are some tips for choosing toys for your little ones

1.       Think old school.  Remember when you were young, you had the animal farm, or doll house that didn’t have a working doorbell or a battery operated cow that said moo. You had to act it out yourself.  This pretend play helps with creativity and imagination instead of quick reinforcement from electric generated sounds.

 

2.       Books are always beneficial. Whether you are reading to your child or they are at an age they can start reading simple books, this activity not only helps with language and vocabulary but also a great way to bond with your child.

 

 

3.       Spark the imagination and creativity. Manipulatives like blocks, legos, playdoh, markers, and  age appropriate crafts can grow with your child as their skills progress.  Also pretend play with kitchen sets, trucks, and cars can help kids simulate actions they see around them.

 

4.       Bored? Try a Board game. Board games are great for turn taking, following directions, and social interactions. Again, I prefer to look for non- electronic versions.  This way you don’t have to worry about replacing batteries or even the real dangers of accidental ingestion of batteries.

 

5.       Be active- Kids should not be sitting still most of the day. They don’t necessarily need organized sports at a young age, but they should be moving.  Various size balls, ride on toys, pull toys, all keep kids exercising and stretching during playtime.

 

 

6.       Less is more. Kids get so overwhelmed when they have too many toys to play with or to choose from. I suggest rotating toys that are in view every few weeks so an old action figure may seem novel again and a puzzle will seem exciting if they haven’t put it together for some time.

7.       Be mindful of screen time.  Earlier is not better when it comes to electronic media exposure. Don’t get sucked in to the hype about early infant learning with 2 dimensional screens. Babies need positive parenting and caregiver interactions to foster important brain connections for optimal learning.   So limit screen time (video/ computers games/ phone apps) to less than an hour for children 2 years or older.  Children younger than 5 years old (toddlers and preschoolers)  make sure its developmentally appropriate and preferable with adult supervision.

toy1.JPG

Kid Friendly Lunchbox Hacks for School

Its been a few months into school and you may have noticed your child seems to be bored of their bag lunch and most of it being brought back home or dumped in the garbage.  Lunch is an important meal to get kids the energy they need to get through the second half of the school day.  Strive to include some protein, fruits and veggies/and healthy sources of fats. Now you don’t have to buy gourmet or even spend a fortune, it’s about making a few simple changes.  Here are 6 easy tips to increase the appeal of the what’s in that lunchbox.

lunchbox.JPG

Cut it up- if you want kids to eat, cut it in small pieces- an apple for example- sliced it will be gobbled up quickly but a whole apple will probably be used for playing catch and thrown right into the garbage.  Tip- slice up an apple in the morning and either add a few drops lemon juice or after slicing, put the apple back together and cover completely in plastic wrap. Both these methods will prevent the apple from turning brown.

Change the shape- peanut butter and jelly is a pretty standard lunch and can even get a bit healthier if made on whole wheat bread to add in some fiber. But the key to eating it all up is the shape. Evidence shows that if you  cut it on the diagonal to make triangles, kids will be more interested in eating it than if cut just straight in half.  Also, and this is simple, use a cookie cutter for fun shapes like a pumpkin for Halloween or even a heart to show how much you care. You can change up the shapes by rolling it up in a tortilla or trying a pita pocket. To healthify instead of jelly use real fruit like banana slices or strawberries.

Use dips- kids love to dip into almost anything, so instead of just thinking about ketchup, pack yogurt, guacamole, salad dressing, hummus and even a big favorite salsa. Then just cut up whatever fruits and veggies you have in your refrigerator from the week.

Do it your self lunchables- is you child always eyeing their friend’s store bought lunchable that’s probably high in salt and processed foods? Well easily you can make your own. There are so many types of lunch containers with lots of little compartments to put different foods in.  And let’s face it, kids love to use their imagination and create. Here is a chance to play with their food before eating it. Some suggestions whole grain crackers, cheese cubes, turkey, chicken, cream cheese, raisin, cucumbers, sliced hard boiled eggs, tuna, carrots and celery.

Use a thermos, now that bringing your own refillable water bottle is all the rage, how about a great metal thermos?  It’s not only good for soup, but also pasta, chili and macaroni and cheese. Here’s another tip- you can keep the thermos extra warm by pouring hot/boiling water into thermos for a minute then emptying it out before adding the food. Your child will be good to go until lunchtime.

Leftovers for lunch- this is my favorite, so I make extra food at dinner and use it for lunch. Change it up so it’s in a different form than served the night before.  For example roasted chicken can be then added on top of a salad, or rolled up in a tortilla like a burrito, add beans to some leftover rice, or cut up turkey sausage and toss it in with some pasta and sprinkle with parmesan cheese.

Lastly as a bonus- add a quick note, with a heart or smiley face, it will surely put your child in a good mood and make for a more pleasant lunch experience. Let me know what lunch hacks work for your family!

12 Tips For a Fun Safe and Somewhat Healthy Halloween

Halloween is definitely a favorite holiday for kids. Children love getting dressed up in costumes, socializing with friends, trick or treating and yes, some candy too. As a pediatrician, I have seen my fair share of stomachaches, injuries and avoidable injuries. Here are some of my  top safety tips as well as some healthy  tips that I promise won’t put a damper on the festivities.

halloween tips.JPG

 

1.     Make sure costumes fit properly. When sleeves are loose and flowing or pants drag on the floor, they are more like to get snagged or caught on objects leading to falls, scraped knees and even broken bones. Other items like long untied belts or high heeled shoes can be hazardous too. Be sure face masks fit properly, especially the eye and nose openings so as not to obscure vision or breathing.

2        Keep costumes brightly colored or use reflective tape.  Bold color or placing reflective tape on your child clothing or even trick or treat bag is important especially if outside in areas that are not well lit. This will make it easier for them to be seen particularly by drivers in cars.

3        Patch test all makeup before using. Kids love face painting, but many of the makeup kits for Halloween don’t use high quality ingredients and may have chemicals that react on skin causing rashes like hives, bumps, redness and itching. Be sure to test on a small area of arm before applying to face.

4        Avoid imported inexpensive costume jewelry for young children. Please be wary and if purchasing please supervise if your young child is wearing accessories that have small parts that can potentially break off causing choking ,be put up their nose or in their ears. In addition young children may put these accessories in their mouth to chew on, causing the paint to come off and be swallowed.  Imported painted costume jewelry items have been known to contain metals like lead and cadmium which are toxic if ingested so if you have a little teether avoid altogether.

5        Do not buy decorative contact lenses. Non prescription contacts can give you the appearance of bright colored eyes( magenta , neon green or Dracula eyes) however because they are not fitted properly, there is potential for severe damage to eyes such as corneal scratches, infections and in some cases even visual loss. It is not worth the risks.

6        Darkness can mean more dangers outside. Supervision is needed by adults or even responsible teenagers while out and about going house to house. It’s a great idea to have a designated route ahead of time. In addition carry flashlights as many neighborhoods may not have sidewalks or even street lamps.  I encourage all homeowners on Halloween to keep their outdoor house lights on as well as to make sure walkways are clear of wet slippery leaves to make the whole neighborhood brighter and safer.

7        Avoid candles in Jack-O -Lanterns.  Kids move fast and not always paying attention to their surroundings. Candles can cause burns and unexpected fires, so instead use a battery operated flameless light or even a flashlight to illuminate your pumpkins.

8        Restrain pets or keep in another room when trick or treaters come to the door. Even the most docile and friendly dogs can get over excited by all the kids and crowds. Children who fear animals may cry or be frightened, others may try petting the tail or animals face causing an unexpected reaction or even get bitten. To avoid any problems keep your pets away from the front door.

9        Eat a good meal before going out trick or treating. Starting out on a full stomach can help discourage kids from wanting to eat the candy and goodies throughout the night and it will help to cut down on binge/ overeating. Yes Halloween stomachaches are a real thing.

10   Walk to the farthest point you are traveling and then trick or treat on the way back home. By doing this, you and your kids are getting a bit more exercise and physical activity, because eventually you have to walk all the way back home.

11   Sort and inspect candy before eating. Even though it is rare for tampering of candy on Halloween, especially if you stick to neigbors that you know, its important to check the candy and home baked goodies, as well as remove any items that may be potential allergens to your child.

12   Share Share Share. Most kids have so much fun on Halloween, but it’s a great time to remind them that not all children may be able to participate in the holiday events. Let your child pick out their favorite items and then have them share and give away the rest to the local hospital, child care centers or even a favorite charity.

 

Remember, Halloween comes but once a year, besides the trick or treating, there are other fun activities to participate in such as drawing on pumpkins, roasting pumpkin seeds and drawing Halloween cards and posters. I wish and your child a spooktacular and safe holiday. – Dr. Jen

College Survival Care Package- A Doctor/Moms Perspective on Essential Items

Has your child settled into their new school, dorm life with a roommate, and eating cafeteria food 24/7?   It’s definitely a big transition for both parent and teenager. You may have initially spent hours decorating and assembling their room to provide comfort in their new surroundings, but what might have been overlooked is the fact that being in this new environment is akin to starting kindergarten when it comes to germs, illnesses and infections. I remember my son could not believe after seeming so healthy, how many coughs, sore throats, stomach bugs, and pains resurfaced when living in such close quarters with other teens that also weren’t always up to par with their hygiene? (right, how often is your child really washing hands, doing weekly laundry, getting enough sleep…)  So as a mom and a pediatrician, here are some college survival items that your freshman, just may appreciate receiving from you in the mail.

College Survival Care Package – Checklist of What to Send

Hydration- Drinking lots of water is a must, so sending a reusable water bottle that they can fill and carry throughout the day is a must

Sore Throats –  lollipops, sucking candies, lozenges  (to help soothe scratchy throats)  tea bags and a microwaveable mug

 Fever/ Pain -  Ibuprofen or Acetaminophen,  as the nearest pharmacy may be miles away, and often they just don’t want to get out of bed to head to the store

Hives/ Allergic skin reactions- antihistamine like Benedryl/Zyrtec/ Claritin/ Allegra

Skin Rashes- Cortisone cream, antibacterial ointment, and a good hydrating moisturizer to keep skin intact

Athletes Foot/ Fungal Infection  - antifungal creams, shower shoes, clean socks and extra towels (in case they aren’t doing their laundry often enough)

Stomach Upset- antacids, ginger and chamomile

Coughs- a jar of honey, extra pillow to prop up head at night

Nail Care- keeping nails short and clean decrease spread infection- nail clipper/nail file

Disinfectant – Air fresheners/ Lysol cleaner, Laundry detergent pods, hand sanitizer

Healthy Snacks  - nuts ,dried fruit, popcorn- for on the go or late night

Sleep/ Rest - ear buds to listen to music to help fall asleep, eye mask, lavender oil, magazines

Probiotic- boosting immune support and balancing digestive tract daily 

First Aid supply- ace bandage, bandaids, cold pack/ice pack, thermometer,

 These essential items will surely  be appreciated by any child  away on their own, especially for the first time.  What else do you think would be helpful?  Let me know in the comments.